Back to School Visuals

These visuals were made to support increasing numbers of students attending school in British Columbia during the pandemic. They address some of the “New Normal” situation. I like to frame it by saying that school is “the same but different” to ease the transition.

Download and share as needed. I hope these are useful!

Back to School

Joint Attention Examples

Simply, joint attention is a shared experience between you and your child – when you both realize it is a shared experience – even if it is just for a fleeting moment. We need joint attention before we can communicate effectively.

The Official Definition:

Joint attention is the ability to “maintain a common focus with another person on an event in the immediate environment, or on a topic through language. Joint attention communication occurs when signals are used to direct another’s attention to an object or event for the purpose of sharing observations or experiences (e.g. commenting on an object or event, requesting information). “(From The SCERTS Model, Vol. 1, by Prizant, Wetherby, Rubin, Laurent, and Rydell, p.313).

Joint Attention Activities:

Note: in this example, the adult has chosen to use the book because the boy likes this book.

Family Math

This site has fun and simple ideas of games and activities you can do at home. Even the kits for purchase could give you ideas of other free activities you could do.

  • Math Scavenger Hunts grades K-5 (free)
  • Play N Take Games Kit (paid)
  • Make N Take Games Kit (paid)
  • Power Pack Games Kit (paid)

Emotional-Regulation

Why Practicing Can Help with Emotional Regulation, by Oregon Behaviour Consultation

  • Being mad “makes us dumb”.
  • Make a plan.
  • Practise to make the best choice ahead of time.
  • Use visual prompts (talk less) to support the person having a hard time.
  • Adjust the plan as needed and practice again.

5 Unhelpful Responses

  • Don’t talk.
  • Don’t try to reason, explain, or lecture.
  • Don’t shout or use a loud or intense voice
  • Don’t respond to oppositional or defiant behaviour.
  • Don’t bring up consequences.

Instead…

  • Use visual prompts.
  • Take a break.
  • Allow thinking time (for both of you) – wait.
  • Use a calm and gentle tone of voice.
  • Allow more thinking time.
  • Have a plan that you have practiced.
  • Be quiet but let them know that this is part of the plan, you are not ignoring them.

Newsela

Current events – Different reading levels

Newslea can help students improve their reading comprehension and keep them current with what is happening in our nation and the world.

Newsela Social Studies, Newsela Science, and The Newsela SEL Collection are free through the 2019/2020 school year. (Teacher registers first.)